A Meditation on Our Communion with the Angels

This meditation was written to acknowledge the feast day of the blessed Archangel, Michael, recognized on September 29th in the Anglican liturgical calendar, and was read at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church on October 11th, 2015.

Angels are mentioned throughout the Old and New Testament, often as hosts or unnamed representatives of the Lord. The Greek word angelos means messenger, and this is the role we see given to Gabriel, who foretells the birth of Christ (Luke 1:26-38) and John the Baptist (Luke 1:5-25), and gives guidance to Daniel (Daniel 8:16). Angels are created beings, made before man, with incorporeal, spiritual bodies. Much of the angelic life is only hinted at in scripture, and although belief in them is required of the Christian, it is also wise not to place excessive emphasis on them in our thoughts, which may lead to superstition and idolatry. Their presence is a comfort and encouragement to us in our Christian walk: Psalm 91:11 tells us, “For he shall give his angels charge over you, to keep you in all your ways,” and again we read in the epistle to the Hebrews, “Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?” This role of protector is seen in the archangel Michael, who is not placed simply in the role of messenger, but as a warrior, who fights against a demon in order to help a messenger angel reach Daniel, and who leads the assault against the Dragon in the Book of Revelation. Angels, like saints, are servants of the Lord, and therefore it is fitting that in our liturgy, as we stand to profess that heaven and earth are full of God’s glory, we acknowledge that we worship our Creator in communion “with Angels and Archangels, and with all the company of heaven.”

Of course, we know of fallen angels, the demons, of whom Saint Peter says in his second epistle, “God did not spare angels when they sinned, but sent them to hell.” The leader of these is Satan the Devil, who appears three times in the Old Testament, once lying about God’s nature in the Book of Genesis, once accusing Job of being incapable of true love for God, and once accusing Joshua the high priest of being an unsuitable intercessor in the book of Zechariah. This provides a negative or distorted view of what angels do: They eternally testify to the glory of God, they witness to God’s love for us and assist in our service to Him in ways unseen, and they vindicate Christ as our High Priest and Redeemer.

Christ was tempted by Satan in the three ways he tempted man in the Old Testament: with food at the expense of true worship, with physical safety at the expense of an honest relationship with the Lord, and with worldly power at the expense of his rightful place as Son of God and Savior of Mankind. Satan thus not only tempted Christ with the full means he has to tempt man, but also demonstrated in his treatment of Christ his total fall from his angelic duties. So it is fitting that after our Lord’s trial, the angels came to minister to him.

Angels are fellow witnesses of Christ’s glory, secret helpers in our commitment to Christian service, and warriors who hold demonic forces at bay. Although they cannot provide the Redemption of Our Savior, Jesus Christ, they do provide sinless models of believers in the Lord: like Gabriel, we are to testify the divinity of Christ and announce that he did come into the world. But like Michael, whose feast day was this past week, we must remain steadfast and resilient in the face of adversity. With the recent shooting in Oregon that targeted Christians for execution, and with persecution on the rise in the world at large, we can take comfort in knowing that God equips us with the same power of the Holy Spirit that he used to create his righteous warrior and servant, Michael the Archangel.

By Anthony G. Cirilla, Oct. 3rd, 2015

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s